I love Grid

I like Grid more and more every day. But the story started a few years ago. Once, as part of the digitization of tools at work, I transferred the form from the paper version to Excel.

The condition was that when printing the excel file, the form had to be identical to the original version (in terms of field sizes and gaps between).

This week it dawned on me that I can transfer my website design to code in the same way thank’s to grid property. A fantastic discovery.

Grid property will save your time

I know that some template creation programs directly allow you to implement a grid in your website design to facilitate the work of programmers, but the project I’m currently working on has been prepared in a program that does not offer such functionality.

At first, it didn’t bother me, but when I started coding a bit more complicated to position components on the page it got messy.

I thought for a long time how to deal with it until it enlightened me. I printed the designs on a piece of paper, made lines, and then threw them into the grid. Bingo, all problems solved. Grid property saves me time.

Did you ever forget the password to your home router?

This week I was polishing the look of the application on different resolutions and apart from a glimpse of knowledge about drawing lines, I learned nothing interesting that I could share.

However, I thought that since most of us are locked up at home, it may turn out that we want to connect a new device to the home network, but we forgot the password to that network.

Someone once knew this password, because one or the other computer connects to the network. Smartphones connect too, but like computers, they don’t want to share a password to that network.

Is there any other way than nervously searching for router documentation?

Yes of course.

How to restore the password to the home router?

The first easiest: find a magic sticker on your router with a password. If that password works, that’s great.

However, for security reasons, it is worth changing this password as soon as possible. Default passwords are usually no problem for hackers.

The second method requires at least one windows computer that has ever been connected to the WiFi network for which we want to know the password.

We turn on this computer and check if it can connect to this network. If so, we only need a few steps to be successful.

The first is to launch the console. In the search box in the toolbar (usually on the bottom bar of the screen next to the Windows logo) we type “cmd”.

From the displayed results, right-click on the “command line” and select the Open as administrator option. A black window will appear in which you must enter the following commands:

netsh wlan show profile (click Enter)

A list of all WiFi networks the computer has ever been connected to will be displayed. We search for the name of interest to us and enter the next command:

netsh wlan show profile netname key = clear (hit Enter)

In place of network_name, enter the name of the network you are interested in.

Information on the selected network will be displayed.

The “Security settings” section is interesting for us. This section contains the password for the selected network in the line named: “Key Content”.

Now, without nervously browsing the documentation or searching for a password on a lost card, we can log into the WiFi network.

Windows is likable 😉

This week I spent almost seven hours working with the code.

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Krzysztof NyrekI love Grid

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